Daily SearchCast, August 31, 2006: Google CEO Eric Schmidt Joins Apple's Board; Download Books From Google; Topix's Long News Search Memory & More!

Today's search podcast covers Google's CEO Eric Schmidt being named to Apple's board of directors; downloading ebooks from Google; how to search a year's worth of news via Topix; geotagging photos on Flickr & more.

Tune-in by listening to this MP3 file, listening via WebmasterRadio at 11:30am Eastern and repeated at 2pm Eastern Monday through Thursday (see instructions here), through iTunes via this link, though our Yahoo Podcasts channel , on our Digg podcasts channel (and vote for us!) or in other ways listed here. You can also use the player below:


powered by ODEO

Need more help tuning in live or finding the chat room? See the Daily SearchCast FAQ.

Here are links to more information about stories discussed:

Advertisement

Upcoming Seminars: SEO and Conversion Rates: Hand-in-hand - RX for Large Paid Search Advertising Campaigns: Anatomy of an Enterprise Solution - Big Brand Search Engine Optimization: Managing Large Campaigns

Stories Discussed In The Show

  • The Day After & Many Thanks!
  • Google CEO Eric Schmidt Joins Apple's Board Of Directors
    Google CEO Eric Schmidt's looking for another small company to help run -- this time, Apple. He's just been elected to Apple's board of directors. Google CEO Dr. Eric Schmidt Joins Apple's Board of Directors is the press release on the move, with these quotes from the two main men:...
  • Download Books For Free From Google Book Search
    Google is now offering free, downloadable versions of public domain books that you can find in Google Book search. Unfortunately, there's no way to browse through a directory of books that are available. However, you can keyword search for them easily, sort of....
  • Topix's Cool Year-Long News Archive
    Somewhat lost among all the search news earlier this month was Topix and its launch of an awesome year-long news archive. It's a great resource and much more than just a cool "click-o-gram" that you'll see at the top of news search pages. News search engines typically only let you go back in time for about a month. After that, new stuff flows in and the old stuff moves out. That's terrible if you want to find news articles about a particular event further back in time....
  • Accoona Review In Ariadne
    Accoonawas recently reviewed in Ariadne magazine by me. (If you're not familiar with Ariadne, it's a quarterly online magazine aimed towards the UK academic market, but with a general wide appeal). I won't go into the entire review since you can read it in the magazine but in brief I'm pleased with the recent developments of Accoona, particularly in the area of news and the easy ways in which searches can quickly be targetted by date, publisher, company, country and more. If Accoona has passed under your radar recently it may be worth another look, and if you're in Europe...
  • Google Uses AdWords Conversion Data To Fight AdSense Fraud?
    ShoeMoney blogged that at the Arbitrage Issues session at SES San Jose, during Q&A time, Kim Malone of Google said that the AdSense team may use AdWords conversion data to determine which sites are trying to fraud advertisers and users (often named Made for AdSense sites - MFAs)....
  • Google's Accuracy Can Easily Cost Advertisers $285 Million
    Brandt Dainow has a interesting article named How Accurate is Google AdWords? In that article, he shows how Google has earned $6 billion from advertising during 2005 and $4.6 billion in the first two quarters of 2006. He explains that if the conservative estimate that 95% of Google's revenue comes from AdWords, that puts Google's income from AdWords last year at $5.7 billion and $4.37 billion in the first two quarters of 2006. Now, if Google's statistical accuracy in detecting invalid clicks is 95%, which is pretty good, then they "mis-billed $285 million last year." Read the full article at...
  • Search Engines Handle No Index Inconsistently
    Matt Cutts has a nice illustrated survey of how various major search engines deal with the meta noindex tag in Handling noindex meta tags. He finds inconsistency, with this being the summary:...
  • Keywords In URL May Help Rankings, Google's Matt Cutts Says
    The hotly debated SEO topic of, does having keywords in your file names help with your rankings, will probably start all over again. Matt Cutts of Google wrote at his blog, and I quote; Most bloggy sites tend to have words from the title of a post in the url; having keywords from the post title in the url also can help search engines judge the quality of a page....
  • Windows Live QnA Beta Now Live
    The Windows Live QnA Blog announced the other day that Windows Live QnA is now a public beta, meaning you can test it out yourself at http://qna.live.com/. Question and Answer search engines are now the new hot social search thing. Yahoo has been pouring money and promotions into Yahoo Answers and Google has their Google Answers product for a while. We covered QnA in the past, the first time was when they had a private beta and the second time is when we saw some screen captures posted. We may have a more detailed review on Windows Live QnA in...
  • InsiderPages' 'Answers'
    InsiderPages, one of the top "social directory" sites, has launched its equivalent of Yahoo!'s Answers: "Insider Advice." It's only available to members but allows people to ask open-ended questions of the community. The press release offers an explanation and some examples: Posting a question on Insider Advice is quick and easy. Members simply click on the Insider Advice button, type in a question and hit “submit”. They can add as much detail or background to their question as they like. Insider Pages alerts them to replies to their queries via email and then they can sit back and read the...
  • Flickr Adds Geo Tagging
    Techcrunch reports on the Flickr blog announcement that Flickr has added Geo Tagging to their feature set. Geo tagging will enable Flickr users to mark the pictures with geographic specific information, this way people can know where you took that photo. You can also search for photos within a specific location and then refine that search based on a keyword. Flickr has two very useful screencasts on (1) how to geotag your own photos and (2) searching and exploring geotagged photos. These are neat features, for sure, but I think they seriously need to work on making the registration easier...
  • Over 1.2 Million Flickr Photos Tagged In 24 Hours
    Flickr geotagging has clearly taken off in a big way, with the FlickrBlog reporting that 1,234,384 photographs were geotagged in the first 24 hours of the service launching, with another 400,000 9 hours later. In general the service has been very well received and the ability to do more complex searches is a real bonus. However, there's a fair amount of disappointment outside the US and Canada; the maps used for the service are poor at best, with very little detail, making the service close to unusable. I tried it myself and there are large tracts of nothing in the...
  • Internet Archive Suit Settled
    News.com reported that the suit issued back in July 2005 over the Wayback Machine and the Internet Archive has now been settled. Of course, the terms of the settlement have not been released to the public. In short, there was a page archived by the Wayback Machine that had sensitive information on it, the Wayback Machine technically should not of indexed it but a "temporary bug" had it indexed for a bit. Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive said, "this is really a lawsuit between two parties and we got sort of dragged into it and I'm glad we're now...
  • Microsoft ContentAds Inviting Advertisers into Pilot
    Microsoft adCenter began inviting selected advertisers into the ContentAds pilot, which is expected to begin displaying contextual ads across selected MSN properties such as Real Estate and Money this fall. The text-based ads, which will be contextually targeted, also allow advertisers to target using both the demographics, geotargeting and incremental bidding tools. For all the scoop, please see JenSense.com...
  • Google AdSense Sued by Suspended Publisher
    Steve Bryant at eWeek reports that a woman has sued Google after she was suspended from the program for clicking on her own ads. Theresa B. Bradley filed a lawsuit against Google for $250,000 for fraud and misrepresentation, even though she admits she clicked her own ads "to verify that the advertisers were not selling competing products"....
  • Daily SearchCast, Special Edition: Buffy The Search Marketing Vampire Slayer

Post a comment

Yes, registration is a pain! But TypeKey is free, and signing up will let you comment on many other blogs as well. Sorry we have to use it, but it saves us from comment spam. Your comment should appear after posting. If not, the software may have flagged it as a spam attempt. We'll manually approve it as quickly as possible, if that happens.)

Podcast Info